Six Months Post-Op

It’s been six months since having Tex and two other parathyroid glands removed. With regards to my post-op scar, I was told that by six months it would be nearly invisible. This is not the case, but that may be due to the need to expand the cut during surgery when they found they needed to explore further. Still, it’s not terribly hideous and is fading and breaking up–sort of. My parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels have returned to normal, as have my blood calcium levels. (Yay!) Unfortunately, my thyroid levels (from where half the thyroid had to be removed to take out the last adenoma) have worsened. I’m still not suffering any of the major symptoms of hypothyroidism (except perhaps fatigue, but I’m engaged in stress and another health battle that I think is a bigger problem there) and so I’m still refusing my endocrinologist’s recommendation that I begin hormone replacement therapy.

One of the major factors for this recommendation in November was that I had put on about five pounds following my surgery. I have, however, since lost those five pounds and then some. In fact, I’m only a pound more than I was this time last year, which is within a healthy BMI. When I returned from Ireland in January, I began a completely grain-free diet–no wheat, barely, rice, oats, etc., and even no corn. I had made a decision toward this before my trip, after reading up on the benefits of grain-free diets in lowering blood sugar levels and lessening (even curing) the symptoms of PCOS over time. The decisive moment came after a rather painful six weeks in another country, many tears, vomiting, an emergency room visit due to a burst ovarian cyst, an ultrasound, and my doctor, upon my return home, telling me, “Well, yeah, there’s a small cyst still there but let’s wait it out.” The “let’s wait it out” is the same response I had a year ago, but apparently my case is not considered severe enough yet despite the worsening of my pain due to the cyst regrowing over and over again. (Kind of like my high calcium levels hadn’t been considered severe until I insisted on my PTH levels being tested.)

So I’ve gone rogue and am handling things myself. The grain-free diet has been a biggie, proven already by the weight loss. Both hypothyroidism and PCOS are major culprits of difficulty to lose and keep off weight, which in turn makes the symptoms of both disorders worse. The weight loss is the only thing that kept my endocrinologist from really pushing for hormone replacement therapy when I saw her in February. But it should also be helping the ovarian issues. Along with the diet, I’ve started using natural progesterone cream and nascent iodine supplements. Both help with PCOS, both help with thyroid issues.

My next followup is in August. I’m crossing my fingers that by then things will have started to change–I know that ovarian/hormonal issues tend to take four to six months to reverse and get better, and I’ll be just over the six month mark at this appointment. I’ll be eleven months post-surgery at that point, too, so fingers crossed the same is true for thyroid. It would make for a nice birthday present.

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

One thought on “Six Months Post-Op

  1. […] After three years of being told I have PCOS, that the pain I felt was likely from ovarian cysts, and that I should “take a couple ibuprofen,”  I was growing weary of the “wait and watch” approach my PCP had enacted. My six weeks in Ireland between December and January was marred by several bouts of severe pain, including one that landed me in the ER. […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: